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Action Heating & Air Conditioning in Walterboro, SC

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(843) 890-0532

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South Carolina is one of the most beautiful places in the United States to call home. However, our local weather can be extreme – high temps and thick humidity in the summer and chilly winter weather during cold months. As a local HVAC company in Walterboro, SC, we know how crucial it is to have a quality HVAC system in your home and experienced technicians to keep it working correctly.

With more than 35 years of serving the Lowcountry, we are proud to be an active part of our local community. As your neighbors, we are here for all of your HVAC needs, whether you need a new AC unit installed this summer or a heat pump replacement this winter. With a reliable team of NATE-certified technicians and decades of experience in our industry, no HVAC project is too big or small for us to handle.

We offer highly competitive pricing and convenient financing options for all of our clients. At the end of the day, our goal is to make it easy and affordable to live comfortably in your home all year long. We are committed to hard work, honesty, and integrity with every service we offer. If you aren’t 100% satisfied with our work, we’ll do our part to make it right.

Service Areas

Here are just a few of the reasons why homeowners and business owners in South Carolina trust Action Heating & Air Conditioning:

  • We have been serving clients in South Carolina since 1983 – before many of our clients were even born!
  • We provide a wide range of HVAC services for both heating and air conditioning.
  • We are committed to giving our clients the highest quality products and services at affordable prices.
  • As a Carrier® Factory Authorized Dealer, we have the best HVAC units available.
  • We are members of the South Carolina Association of Heating and Air Conditioning Contractors.
  • We are members of our local Chamber of Commerce and the Air Conditioning Contractors of America.

If you need a trusted AC repair company in Walterboro, know that our team is geared up and ready to help you today. While you browse our website, have a look at just a few of our specialties here at Action Heating & Air Conditioning:

Air Conditioning Repair in Walterboro, SC

Summers in the Lowcountry are hot, humid, and sticky. After a long day at the beach or downtown with your friends, nothing feels better than kicking back on the sofa while your air conditioning cools you off. On the other hand, nothing feels worse than walking into your home and feeling warm, stale air hit your face. Those who know, know – having your AC go out during a South Carolina summer is no joke. With time, a relatively minor inconvenience can turn into a real health problem.

In situations like these, something has probably gone wrong with your HVAC system. If your AC has stopped working in the middle of summer, it’s time to call Action Heating & Air Conditioning right away. Our team of certified HVAC professionals has years of experience repairing and servicing AC equipment. It doesn’t matter how old your unit is or what brand you bought – we have the skills to get your home comfort system up and running in no time.

Here are just a few of the AC issues that our talented team can help solve for you:
Air Conditioning Drainage Block

Air Conditioning Drainage Block

Over time, condensation builds up in your AC equipment because of its cooling process. This accumulated byproduct must be drained regularly, or the increased amounts of moisture can damage your air conditioner’s components.

Air Conditioning Drainage Block

Air Conditioning Refrigerant Leak

Refrigerant is the substance responsible for keeping your home nice and cool in the summer. When refrigerant levels drop due to a leak, it will affect your AC equipment’s ability to cool your home. If your HVAC unit isn’t blowing cold air, this could be a reason why.

Air Conditioning Drainage Block

Heater Keeps Running

This is a common AC issue in South Carolina and the U.S. in general. Sometimes this problem is fixed by switching your thermostat to “auto.” If that doesn’t work, you may have a broken thermostat or a wiring issue that needs to be addressed quickly.

Air Conditioning Drainage Block

Burning Odors

It’s normal for your heater to produce a slight burning smell if it hasn’t been used in a while. However, if you are experiencing a persistent burning smell during the summer months when your air conditioning is on, it could be a serious problem. Turn off your HVAC system immediately and call our office as soon as possible so that we may send out a technician to diagnose your problem.

Air Conditioning Drainage Block

Broken Air Conditioning Compressor Fan

This fan plays an important role in your AC unit’s heat transfer process. When your air conditioning fan breaks, your AC equipment won’t be able to cool your home off in the summer when it’s needed the most.

Our Special Offers

One of our goals as a company is to provide HVAC repair services at fair and competitive prices. In addition, we want you to feel confident about investing in high-quality heating and cooling systems without having to worry a lot about the costs. We make sure to provide honest and accurate quotes and we offer a variety of financing options. We want you to get the best bang for your buck, so here are some special offers.

See Our Offer

If you are experiencing any of the problems above, be sure to hire a professional contractor to fix your issues. For your safety, don’t ever try to make HVAC repairs on your own unless you are trained. When the time come to have your air conditioning system repaired, our team of licensed AC technicians will handle all of the hard work on your behalf. That way, you can stay safe and have peace of mind knowing you’re in good hands.

Air Conditioning Install in Walterboro, SC

Your HVAC system works hard all year long. If you have gone years without much maintenance or AC repair, you probably bought a great HVAC unit. However, with constant use and even normal wear and tear, even the highest-quality HVAC systems are prone to malfunctions. Eventually, it will need to be replaced.

If you need an energy-efficient, reliable cooling system for your home or business, you have come to the right place. We have decades of experience installing new AC systems for our clients and can handle any installation project you have. As a Carrier® Factory Authorized Dealer, we have the most top-rated AC systems available in South Carolina.

At Action Heating & Air Conditioning, we know that buying a new air conditioner and installing it can be a huge source of stress. But when you work with us, it doesn’t have to be that way. We have made it our mission to make the AC installation process easy and efficient for our customers. That way, they can focus more on living life and enjoying their home while we work hard on their AC install in Walterboro.

Whether you plan to replace a faulty air conditioning system or need a Carrier unit for your new construction home, we have got you covered. We will work with you directly to find the best fit for your home and budget. We are also happy to answer all of your AC installation questions prior to and during your initial service appointment.

Common Signs That You Need a New AC Install in Walterboro, SC

Trying to figure out whether your air conditioner needs to be repaired or replaced can be a tricky decision to make. Most people have a hard time letting things go, and that includes AC units. It can be hard to know when to let go of the old and welcome in the new. To help save you time and make your decision a little easier, keep the following signs in mind. If you find yourself saying, “that sounds like my AC unit,” it might be time for a new air conditioning installation.

Strange Noises

Almost all air conditioners make a bit of low-level noise as they warm up and turn off. However, if you hear loud, unusual noises, it might be a sign that your air conditioner’s time is coming to an end. Buzzing and rattling noises are often indicators of a loose part. Grinding and whistling noises may mean something more serious is happening. Because these issues won’t dissipate over time, it’s crucial to have your air conditioner examined if you hear loud, strange noises.

Frequent Repairs

Walterboro AC repair is essential for keeping your air conditioner working efficiently. Sometimes, however, it makes more sense from a cost perspective to install a replacement system. This is especially true if your repairs are racking up. Some AC experts suggest using the “$5,000 rule” if you’re considering a new AC install. Simply multiply the age of your air conditioner by the costs you have been paying to repair your unit. If that amount is over $5,000, it may make more financial sense to install a new air conditioner rather than pay for expensive repairs throughout the year.

Higher Energy Bills

If you notice that your energy bill has significantly increased in price, it could be a sign that your HVAC unit is struggling to cool your home effectively. Try to be mindful of your air conditioner’s cooling cycles. If you notice frequent cycles, even in the summer, it could be the reason for your increased energy bill. In these cases, it’s best to have an expert test your system to see if a repair or replacement option is best for your family.

Age of Air Conditioning Unit

This sign is a no-brainer and one of the easiest ways to tell if you need to install a new AC system. On average, your HVAC unit will have a lifespan of 12 to 15 years. If your unit is more than ten years old and doesn’t have the “pizzaz” that it once had, it might be time to think about installing a new air conditioning unit.

R-22 Refrigerant

Old air conditioners usually require a type of refrigerant called R-22. This substance is very harmful to the environment and has been all but outlawed on newer HVAC systems. If your AC unit is old enough to require R-22, you should give serious thought to replacing your system with a newer, environmentally friendly solution.

Call Action Heating & Air Conditioning Today!

Over our 35+ year history, we have built our reputation on honesty, skilled workmanship, and reasonable pricing. If you are on the hunt for the highest quality air conditioning repair in Walterboro, SC, give our office a call today.

Call us at (843) 890-0532

Protecting Your Investment

Your air conditioning system works very hard every day, all year long to keep your home comfy and cool. Machines that work hard year-round are going to require maintenance and ongoing services to stay operational.

As a family-owned and operated HVAC company in Walterboro, SC, we know better than anyone how expensive it can be to maintain an AC unit. We know that money doesn’t grow on trees. We also understand that finding last-minute resources to fix an air conditioning system can be challenging. That is why we offer extended warranties for your new or existing AC equipment. With an extended warranty from Action Heating & Air Conditioning, you benefit from repairs, replacement, and additional services covered under warranty. That way, you can enjoy your HVAC products as long as possible.

If you’re having second thoughts about purchasing an extended warranty, consider these points:
  • Generally speaking, HVAC equipment lasts anywhere from 10 to 15 years. However, warranties provided by the factory will often expire before the service life of your cooling unit is over. With an extended warranty, your indoor comfort system is covered even if the factory warranty expires.
  • Having an extended warranty on your AC system gives you the chance to project and plan for any HVAC costs. This helps you balance your budget and anticipate expenses so you aren’t caught off guard. Having a warranty will also help protect your budget against increases in labor and parts costs due to inflation.
  • If you’re thinking of selling your home, having an extended warranty may help raise your home’s value. You may also be able to transfer your extended warranty to your new home if you choose to do so.

Latest News in Walterboro

Former Senator McLeod leaves a legacy

Colleton County and the State of South Carolina lost a devoted servant, leader and friend as former S.C. Sen. Peden McLeod, 81 was laid to rest on Tuesday, January 4.Funeral services were held at Bethel United Methodist Church, and the former senator was interred at Live Oak Cemetery in Walterboro.McLeod’s long and distinguished resume of service began more than 50 years ago and continued throughout his lifetime.On July 7, 1962, he married his wife, Mary Waite Hamrick, and served active duty in the U.S. Army from 1...

Colleton County and the State of South Carolina lost a devoted servant, leader and friend as former S.C. Sen. Peden McLeod, 81 was laid to rest on Tuesday, January 4.

Funeral services were held at Bethel United Methodist Church, and the former senator was interred at Live Oak Cemetery in Walterboro.

McLeod’s long and distinguished resume of service began more than 50 years ago and continued throughout his lifetime.

On July 7, 1962, he married his wife, Mary Waite Hamrick, and served active duty in the U.S. Army from 1962 to 1964, stationed at Fort Holabird, MD, and Fort Bragg, NC.

He attended Wofford College in 1962 where he served as the president of several organizations. He was the Junior Class president and Senior Class president. He went on to the University of South Carolina School of Law in 1967, where he graduated third in his class. While there, he served as Phi Delta Phi President, was a member of the Society of Wig and Robe and was a member of the Editorial Board for the University of South Carolina Law Review.

McLeod passed the bar and went to work at McLeod, Fraser & Cone Law Firm.

In 1988, he founded the Bank of Walterboro, now the Bank of the Lowcountry, and served as its board chairman and chief executive officer.

McLeod was a permanent member of the United States Fourth Judicial Circuit Conference, was a member of the House of Delegates for the South Carolina Bar from 1975 to 1983, and served as a member of the Walterboro City Council from 1970 to 1972.

In his list of other community contributions, McLeod served as commander of Post 93 of the American Legion from 1971 to 1972; as district chairman of the Boy Scouts of America from 1967 to 1971; as a South Carolina Bar Member, House of Delegates, 1975-1983; as a member of the Colleton County Bar Association; as a member of the American Bar Association; Member SC Commission on the Future; as a member of Omar and Coastal Shrine Scottish Rite of Freemasonry; as a member of the Lions Club; as a member of Walterboro Elks Lodge Unity Lodge #55 AFM; and as a Captain in the United States Army Reserves from 1962-1973;.

McLeod also had a distinguished career in the General Assembly. Elected to the House of Representatives in 1972 from Colleton County, he served as assistant majority leader from 1977 to 1979; was chairman of the Joint Appropriations Review Committee from 1978 to 1979; was elected to the Senate in 1979; became chairman of the Senate Medical Affairs Committee; and remained in the Senate until Oct. 1, 1990, when he became code commissioner and director of the Legislative Council, a position he held until Feb. 16, 1998.

In the latter capacity, he was a commissioner of the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws and served as a lifetime member, the secretary of the Judicial Council of the State of South Carolina, and a commissioner of the Constitutional Ballot Commission.

He was awarded the Order of the Palmetto, the highest civilian honor which recognizes a lifetime of extraordinary achievement, service and contributions nationally or statewide, by former Governor David Beasley in 1998.

The South Carolina General Assembly passed a resolution in May 2020 to honor McLeod at the request of the Department of Transportation by naming the bridge that crosses the Edisto River along U.S. Highway 17 in Colleton County the “Senator Peden McLeod Bridge.” Dignitaries from across the state of South Carolina were present for the event. The resolution reads, “It would be fitting and proper to further recognize the good works of this son of South Carolina by having a bridge in his beloved Colleton County named in his honor.”

At his dedication ceremony, McLeod graciously accepted the highway sign and framed resolution, and remarked, “I am grateful to the people who elected me and gave me the opportunity to serve them. I always believed that I should always do what was right and never give up,” said McLeod.

“I am very proud of my record of service. I gave a lot of time and effort to Colleton. I could not have done any of this without my family.”

Lowcountry Urgent Care swamped with patients amid Covid spike

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The Lowcountry Urgent Care in Walterboro is facing a challenge keeping up with all of the patients walking through its doors.On Tuesday, staff took to social media to ask for patience as the parking lot filled up and the time in the waiting room increased.“It’s crazy. . . In the last 5-6 days we have seen it absolutely skyrocket,” said Megan Gibbons, director of clinical services for Lowcounty Urgent Care. “Typically, I would say we are probably seeing up to three times our norm...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The Lowcountry Urgent Care in Walterboro is facing a challenge keeping up with all of the patients walking through its doors.

On Tuesday, staff took to social media to ask for patience as the parking lot filled up and the time in the waiting room increased.

“It’s crazy. . . In the last 5-6 days we have seen it absolutely skyrocket,” said Megan Gibbons, director of clinical services for Lowcounty Urgent Care. “Typically, I would say we are probably seeing up to three times our normal amount of patients. So currently, we’re seeing well over 120 patients a day. We have seen two and a half, three hour waits because of the volume influx.”

The Walterboro clinic has just two providers and Gibbons says some patients are not taking the longer wait times in stride.

“There has been, you know, some threats and some cursing, issues with our patients and our staff,” Gibbons said. “We just ask that everybody show patience and kindness because we all are trying to do everything we can to support the community. We are seeing as many people as humanly possibly each day.”

The demand for testing is the number one driver of wait times for the urgent care. Bridget Winston with the South Carolina Office of Rural Health says they’re hearing from rural hospitals that staffing can be as equally challenging as the surge of patients continues.

“They’ve got staff who are getting COVID themselves or you know, perhaps caring for a family member at home who has contracted covid,” Winston said. “So then they are short staff in a time where demand for testing is very high. So that has been a problem.”

Winston says many of the rural hospitals are transferring covid patients to larger hospitals. While that may take a patient away from family and friends, it is helping to keep the doors open at some of these scattered facilities that are sometimes the only option for miles around.

“Certainly, there is burnout and certainly they are working nonstop. Certainly, they have staffing shortages that they’re trying to keep up with, but, you know, we have not heard from any of them that it has been a dire situation or a catastrophic situation,” Winston said. “No one has had to close their doors, to our knowledge.”

Winston says their biggest concern is simply making sure that rural clinics continue to receive the same resource and supplies as more urban centers.

She says they aren’t seeing shortages now, but are watching the availability of testing supplies as the omicron surge continues. She says it’s imperative to make sure rural residents have equitable access to healthcare.

Gibbons says one problem that is bogging things down is people who think they were exposed to covid but don’t have symptoms and can’t accurately be tested yet. She says if you have been exposed you need to wait 2 to 3 days before getting tested, unless you have symptoms for a test to be accurate.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Lowcountry Regional Airport will apply for Civil Rights grant

vbrown@lowcountry.comThe Lowcountry Regional Airport Commission met Thursday, January 13 and unanimously voted to request that both the City of Walterboro and Colleton County submit Civil Rights Historical Register grant applications for the airport.The airport has a long, historic past.It opened in 1933 as a landing field, but in 1942 the United States Air Force needed a training airfield, so control was turned over to the USAF in February 1942.A construction program began to turn the civil airport into a militar...

vbrown@lowcountry.com

The Lowcountry Regional Airport Commission met Thursday, January 13 and unanimously voted to request that both the City of Walterboro and Colleton County submit Civil Rights Historical Register grant applications for the airport.

The airport has a long, historic past.

It opened in 1933 as a landing field, but in 1942 the United States Air Force needed a training airfield, so control was turned over to the USAF in February 1942.

A construction program began to turn the civil airport into a military airfield with runways and hangars, several taxiways, a large parking apron and a control tower. The military airport later hosted the largest camouflage school in the US, as well as a German Prisoner of War Camp with 250 prisoners.

In 1944, it became an advanced combat training base for individual fighters, primarily the black trainees graduating from Tuskegee Army Air Field in Tuskegee, Alabama.

More than 500 Tuskegee Airmen, who proved their dedication and expertise and ended military segregation, trained at Walterboro Army Air Field between April 1944 and October 1945. They flew more than 15,000 individual sorties in Europe and North Africa during World War II. Their impressive performance earned them more than 150 Distinguished Flying Crosses. A memorial at the site commemorates their service.

The motion was made to develop Oral Histories and Artifacts significant to the history of the airport and preserve the historic buildings located at the site.

In other business:

• The LRA Commission voted for airport projects to be submitted to county Capital Projects Sales Tax (CPST) Commission to improve Runway 17/35, runway lights and hangar construction.

The CPST Commission is tasked with the duty of considering proposals for funding capital projects within the County and formulating a question to appear on the ballot in November 2022 to impose a one cent sales tax. The revenues generated by the tax may be used to fund or defray costs of capital improvements.

• The LRA Commission also discussed recent progress with Roger Medlin, airport operations manager, who is reporting that December fuel sales were above average at just under 29.500 gallon for the month.

“We have had record 2021 fuel sales at just over 290,000 gallons for the year. Jet traffic is on the increase into the Lowcountry Regional Airport,” said Medlin. “January fuel sales are off to a very good start as we move into 2022.”

Medlin also reported that a new canopy covering for the fuel trucks was ordered and he was working on the estimate for a tetrahedron. A tetrahedron is an airport wind indicator. It tells pilots the direction of the wind. It is an alternative to a windsock and points into the wind showing pilots which way they should takeoff and land, which is done into the wind.

• Airport Manager Tommy Rowe reported that the State Aeronautics Commission delivered the new Foreign Object Debris sweeper to clean the runways. The purchase was approved by the Airport Commission. He also reported that several people were interested in building one or more corporate hangars here. That could mean significant growth for the airport, he said.

St. Peter’s installs historic marker

vbrown@lowcountry.comMusic and good words rang out recently at St. Peter’s AME Church on Fishburne Street, as guests and members gathered to dedicate a historic marker.For almost 155 years, the iconic church has sat on the same lot and housed many congregations of African Americans throughout the centuries. St. Peter’s A.M.E. Church is the oldest black congregation in the City of Walterboro, and was established under the leadership of Rev. James Nesbitt in 1867. On June 3, 1992, the Colleton County Historical and Pr...

vbrown@lowcountry.com

Music and good words rang out recently at St. Peter’s AME Church on Fishburne Street, as guests and members gathered to dedicate a historic marker.

For almost 155 years, the iconic church has sat on the same lot and housed many congregations of African Americans throughout the centuries. St. Peter’s A.M.E. Church is the oldest black congregation in the City of Walterboro, and was established under the leadership of Rev. James Nesbitt in 1867. On June 3, 1992, the Colleton County Historical and Preservation Society presented St. Peter’s A.M.E. Church with the Walterboro Key Historic Property Award. The award was presented for preserving the visual heritage of the neighborhood and leaving the church in its original state with only a few minor cosmetic changes.

Walterboro Mayor Bill Young and Colleton County Councilman Phillip Taylor were on hand to welcome the guests and state their honor and being present to dedicate the marker.

Also present were Rev. Leon Maxwell, Pastor of St. Peter’s AME Church; Presiding Elder Phillip Anderson of Beaufort District of the AME SED; Victoria Smalls, Executive Director of the Gullah Geechie Cultural Heritage Corridor; and Michael Allen of the WeGOJA Foundation, formerly the South Carolina African American Heritage Foundation.

According to the South Carolina Historical Marker program, the designated markers indicate places important to understanding South Carolina's past, sites of significant events, or historic properties and structures. This marker was sponsored by USDA, WeGOJA Foundation and Colleton County Council. Research for this marker was provided by the Colleton Museum and the South Carolina Historic Preservation Office (SCHPO). Matt Mardell, Director of the Colleton Museum was excited be part of this project. “We were delighted to be able to work with the WeGoja Foundation and SCHPO in order to recognize a place with such historic significance,” said Mardell.

This new marker was installed near the highway and in front of the sanctuary. It reads: “Tradition holds that this African Methodist Episcopal church first met after the Civil War before organizing in 1867 under Rev. James R. Nesbitt. It was part of the A.M.E. church’s Walterboro Circuit which Nesbitt formed in 1868. Members acquired the lot for worship in 1875. The congregation was originally known as Walterboro A.M.E. before later adopting the name St. Peter’s.”

Presently, St. Peter’s A.M.E. is under the leadership of Pastor Leon R. Maxwell & First Lady Shaun J. Maxwell.

Terminated employee sues Walterboro over COVID testing incident

WALTERBORO, S.C. (WCSC) - A Walterboro man says he was wrongfully terminated earlier this year after he left work to get a COVID-19 test. While in isolation waiting for the results, Vernon Gilbert was informed that he had been fired from his job as a truck driver with the City of Walterboro.According to court documents, Gilbert and his attorneys say he showed up to work on Thursday, Feb. 4, 2021 feeling ill and left the work site to get a COVD-19 test at Walterboro Adult & Pediatric Medicine. Those same documents show Gilbert was ...

WALTERBORO, S.C. (WCSC) - A Walterboro man says he was wrongfully terminated earlier this year after he left work to get a COVID-19 test. While in isolation waiting for the results, Vernon Gilbert was informed that he had been fired from his job as a truck driver with the City of Walterboro.

According to court documents, Gilbert and his attorneys say he showed up to work on Thursday, Feb. 4, 2021 feeling ill and left the work site to get a COVD-19 test at Walterboro Adult & Pediatric Medicine. Those same documents show Gilbert was provided a doctor’s note excusing him from work until Feb. 9 or until the results of the test came back.

His test came back negative, but on Monday, according to Gilbert’s employee file, he was terminated for “attendance/tardiness.” According to an email from City Manager Jeff Molinari back in February, Gilbert was not fired for getting the COVID test but rather, “he was terminated for absenteeism and for violation of the City’s administrative guidelines.”

“They said if you feel sick, stay home and don’t come around, and on top of that they shut down city hall so we couldn’t get in the building,” Gilbert said. “By the time I got the doctor’s note they were already gone for the day. The following day I dropped it off to my assistant supervisor.”

When asked for additional information about those administrative guidelines, Molinari said they had no further comment. Live 5 News reached out Molinari’s office again Tuesday but was told they had not received the lawsuit yet and would not be commenting. The lawsuit was filed on Aug. 4.

Court filings suggest the tension in the case comes from whether or not Gilbert properly obtained permission to leave work for the COVID test and whether or not he presented the doctor’s note before the next day of work.

According to the official termination letter obtained through a Freedom of Information Act Request, the city says there was no communication between Gilbert and his supervisors and that he didn’t show up for work on Friday.

Court filings by Gilbert’s attorney allege Gilbert spoke with his direct supervisor before leaving for the worksite to get tested and then returned at 11 a.m. the next day with the doctor’s note. They also claim there is surveillance footage that can verify Gilbert’s account.

Because of the termination, Gilbert was denied unemployment benefits. He says originally he wanted to get his job back, but now he is reconsidering that idea.

“I’m a little afraid to work for the city again because if you can fire me for following doctor’s orders I can only imagine what you’ll do this time,” Gilbert said.

Gilbert’s employee file shows he worked for the city for 14 years. He was written up in 2018 for an attendance issue, but Gilbert says one strike in more than 10 years shouldn’t be enough to fire him.

In the lawsuit, Gilbert’s attorney accuses the city of violating the Families First Coronavirus Response Act which broadly required certain employers to provide sick leave for employees.

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

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