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Action Heating & Air Conditioning in Charleston, SC

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South Carolina is one of the most beautiful places in the United States to call home. However, our local weather can be extreme – high temps and thick humidity in the summer and chilly winter weather during cold months. As a local HVAC company in Charleston, SC, we know how crucial it is to have a quality HVAC system in your home and experienced technicians to keep it working correctly.

With more than 35 years of serving the Lowcountry, we are proud to be an active part of our local community. As your neighbors, we are here for all of your HVAC needs, whether you need a new AC unit installed this summer or a heat pump replacement this winter. With a reliable team of NATE-certified technicians and decades of experience in our industry, no HVAC project is too big or small for us to handle.

We offer highly competitive pricing and convenient financing options for all of our clients. At the end of the day, our goal is to make it easy and affordable to live comfortably in your home all year long. We are committed to hard work, honesty, and integrity with every service we offer. If you aren’t 100% satisfied with our work, we’ll do our part to make it right.

Service Areas

Here are just a few of the reasons why homeowners and business owners in South Carolina trust Action Heating & Air Conditioning:

  • We have been serving clients in South Carolina since 1983 – before many of our clients were even born!
  • We provide a wide range of HVAC services for both heating and air conditioning.
  • We are committed to giving our clients the highest quality products and services at affordable prices.
  • As a Carrier® Factory Authorized Dealer, we have the best HVAC units available.
  • We are members of the South Carolina Association of Heating and Air Conditioning Contractors.
  • We are members of our local Chamber of Commerce and the Air Conditioning Contractors of America.

If you need a trusted AC repair company in Charleston, know that our team is geared up and ready to help you today. While you browse our website, have a look at just a few of our specialties here at Action Heating & Air Conditioning:

Air Conditioning Repair in Charleston, SC

Summers in the Lowcountry are hot, humid, and sticky. After a long day at the beach or downtown with your friends, nothing feels better than kicking back on the sofa while your air conditioning cools you off. On the other hand, nothing feels worse than walking into your home and feeling warm, stale air hit your face. Those who know, know – having your AC go out during a South Carolina summer is no joke. With time, a relatively minor inconvenience can turn into a real health problem.

In situations like these, something has probably gone wrong with your HVAC system. If your AC has stopped working in the middle of summer, it’s time to call Action Heating & Air Conditioning right away. Our team of certified HVAC professionals has years of experience repairing and servicing AC equipment. It doesn’t matter how old your unit is or what brand you bought – we have the skills to get your home comfort system up and running in no time.

Here are just a few of the AC issues that our talented team can help solve for you:
Air Conditioning Drainage Block

Air Conditioning Drainage Block

Over time, condensation builds up in your AC equipment because of its cooling process. This accumulated byproduct must be drained regularly, or the increased amounts of moisture can damage your air conditioner’s components.

Air Conditioning Drainage Block

Air Conditioning Refrigerant Leak

Refrigerant is the substance responsible for keeping your home nice and cool in the summer. When refrigerant levels drop due to a leak, it will affect your AC equipment’s ability to cool your home. If your HVAC unit isn’t blowing cold air, this could be a reason why.

Air Conditioning Drainage Block

Heater Keeps Running

This is a common AC issue in South Carolina and the U.S. in general. Sometimes this problem is fixed by switching your thermostat to “auto.” If that doesn’t work, you may have a broken thermostat or a wiring issue that needs to be addressed quickly.

Air Conditioning Drainage Block

Burning Odors

It’s normal for your heater to produce a slight burning smell if it hasn’t been used in a while. However, if you are experiencing a persistent burning smell during the summer months when your air conditioning is on, it could be a serious problem. Turn off your HVAC system immediately and call our office as soon as possible so that we may send out a technician to diagnose your problem.

Air Conditioning Drainage Block

Broken Air Conditioning Compressor Fan

This fan plays an important role in your AC unit’s heat transfer process. When your air conditioning fan breaks, your AC equipment won’t be able to cool your home off in the summer when it’s needed the most.

Our Special Offers

One of our goals as a company is to provide HVAC repair services at fair and competitive prices. In addition, we want you to feel confident about investing in high-quality heating and cooling systems without having to worry a lot about the costs. We make sure to provide honest and accurate quotes and we offer a variety of financing options. We want you to get the best bang for your buck, so here are some special offers.

See Our Offer

If you are experiencing any of the problems above, be sure to hire a professional contractor to fix your issues. For your safety, don’t ever try to make HVAC repairs on your own unless you are trained. When the time come to have your air conditioning system repaired, our team of licensed AC technicians will handle all of the hard work on your behalf. That way, you can stay safe and have peace of mind knowing you’re in good hands.

Air Conditioning Install in Charleston, SC

Your HVAC system works hard all year long. If you have gone years without much maintenance or AC repair, you probably bought a great HVAC unit. However, with constant use and even normal wear and tear, even the highest-quality HVAC systems are prone to malfunctions. Eventually, it will need to be replaced.

If you need an energy-efficient, reliable cooling system for your home or business, you have come to the right place. We have decades of experience installing new AC systems for our clients and can handle any installation project you have. As a Carrier® Factory Authorized Dealer, we have the most top-rated AC systems available in South Carolina.

At Action Heating & Air Conditioning, we know that buying a new air conditioner and installing it can be a huge source of stress. But when you work with us, it doesn’t have to be that way. We have made it our mission to make the AC installation process easy and efficient for our customers. That way, they can focus more on living life and enjoying their home while we work hard on their AC install in Charleston.

Whether you plan to replace a faulty air conditioning system or need a Carrier unit for your new construction home, we have got you covered. We will work with you directly to find the best fit for your home and budget. We are also happy to answer all of your AC installation questions prior to and during your initial service appointment.

Common Signs That You Need a New AC Install in Charleston, SC

Trying to figure out whether your air conditioner needs to be repaired or replaced can be a tricky decision to make. Most people have a hard time letting things go, and that includes AC units. It can be hard to know when to let go of the old and welcome in the new. To help save you time and make your decision a little easier, keep the following signs in mind. If you find yourself saying, “that sounds like my AC unit,” it might be time for a new air conditioning installation.

Strange Noises

Almost all air conditioners make a bit of low-level noise as they warm up and turn off. However, if you hear loud, unusual noises, it might be a sign that your air conditioner’s time is coming to an end. Buzzing and rattling noises are often indicators of a loose part. Grinding and whistling noises may mean something more serious is happening. Because these issues won’t dissipate over time, it’s crucial to have your air conditioner examined if you hear loud, strange noises.

Frequent Repairs

Charleston AC repair is essential for keeping your air conditioner working efficiently. Sometimes, however, it makes more sense from a cost perspective to install a replacement system. This is especially true if your repairs are racking up. Some AC experts suggest using the “$5,000 rule” if you’re considering a new AC install. Simply multiply the age of your air conditioner by the costs you have been paying to repair your unit. If that amount is over $5,000, it may make more financial sense to install a new air conditioner rather than pay for expensive repairs throughout the year.

Higher Energy Bills

If you notice that your energy bill has significantly increased in price, it could be a sign that your HVAC unit is struggling to cool your home effectively. Try to be mindful of your air conditioner’s cooling cycles. If you notice frequent cycles, even in the summer, it could be the reason for your increased energy bill. In these cases, it’s best to have an expert test your system to see if a repair or replacement option is best for your family.

Age of Air Conditioning Unit

This sign is a no-brainer and one of the easiest ways to tell if you need to install a new AC system. On average, your HVAC unit will have a lifespan of 12 to 15 years. If your unit is more than ten years old and doesn’t have the “pizzaz” that it once had, it might be time to think about installing a new air conditioning unit.

R-22 Refrigerant

Old air conditioners usually require a type of refrigerant called R-22. This substance is very harmful to the environment and has been all but outlawed on newer HVAC systems. If your AC unit is old enough to require R-22, you should give serious thought to replacing your system with a newer, environmentally friendly solution.

Call Action Heating & Air Conditioning Today!

Over our 35+ year history, we have built our reputation on honesty, skilled workmanship, and reasonable pricing. If you are on the hunt for the highest quality air conditioning repair in Charleston, SC, give our office a call today.

Call us at (843) 890-0532

Protecting Your Investment

Your air conditioning system works very hard every day, all year long to keep your home comfy and cool. Machines that work hard year-round are going to require maintenance and ongoing services to stay operational.

As a family-owned and operated HVAC company in Charleston, SC, we know better than anyone how expensive it can be to maintain an AC unit. We know that money doesn’t grow on trees. We also understand that finding last-minute resources to fix an air conditioning system can be challenging. That is why we offer extended warranties for your new or existing AC equipment. With an extended warranty from Action Heating & Air Conditioning, you benefit from repairs, replacement, and additional services covered under warranty. That way, you can enjoy your HVAC products as long as possible.

If you’re having second thoughts about purchasing an extended warranty, consider these points:
  • Generally speaking, HVAC equipment lasts anywhere from 10 to 15 years. However, warranties provided by the factory will often expire before the service life of your cooling unit is over. With an extended warranty, your indoor comfort system is covered even if the factory warranty expires.
  • Having an extended warranty on your AC system gives you the chance to project and plan for any HVAC costs. This helps you balance your budget and anticipate expenses so you aren’t caught off guard. Having a warranty will also help protect your budget against increases in labor and parts costs due to inflation.
  • If you’re thinking of selling your home, having an extended warranty may help raise your home’s value. You may also be able to transfer your extended warranty to your new home if you choose to do so.

Latest News in Charleston

This South Carolina soul food restaurant was named one of the best places to eat in US

A humble South Carolina soul food restaurant was named one of the best places to eat in the nation.Hannibal’s Soul Kitchen in Charleston is among the top U.S. restaurants that The New York Times is “excited about right now.”Hannibal’s was the only South Carolina restaurant to make the list, whic...

A humble South Carolina soul food restaurant was named one of the best places to eat in the nation.

Hannibal’s Soul Kitchen in Charleston is among the top U.S. restaurants that The New York Times is “excited about right now.”

Hannibal’s was the only South Carolina restaurant to make the list, which the newspaper said was created after sending “critics, reporters and editors around the country to find the 50 most vibrant and delicious restaurants in 2021.” From coast to coast, eateries that serve up a variety of dishes received recognition.

“Some are classics, still great after decades,” The New York Times reported Tuesday. “Others are in their prime, restaurants at their practiced peaks. And still others are newcomers, intrepidly making their way through the roughest stretch the restaurant business is likely to endure.”

Restaurants have been hard hit during the coronavirus pandemic, with some forced to close and now having trouble finding adequate staffing.

Hannibal’s received a nod for its blue crab dish, with meat that’s “pan-fried so it’s crispy but still retains bits of soft flesh, piled generously over white rice.”

In addition to serving crab, the restaurant says its menu has other Gullah-style seafood and Geechee-style meat dishes and sides.

The Gullah Geechee are descendants of enslaved people first brought from Africa to work along the South Carolina coast in the 1700s. Many of their traditional dishes have spread across the region, including gumbo and shrimp and grits, according to the Discover South Carolina tourism website.

Similar to the restaurant’s namesake “Hannibal” Huger — whose name evokes the man remembered for leading an army that delivered the Romans a shocking defeat in the year 216 — the restaurant said it has overcome the odds to succeed.

“Hannibal’s Kitchen isn’t one of those fancy restaurants with an exquisite atmosphere and finery, but it serves some of the best soul food cuisine in the area,” the restaurant said on its website. “Owner L.J. Huger says the family owned & operated restaurant has ‘been feeding the soul of the city’ for more than 40 years because what the restaurant lacks in ambience, they more than make up for in taste.”

It’s not the first time a South Carolina restaurant has made a national list.

Halls Chophouse in Charleston, Jack of Cups Saloon in Folly Beach and Rainbow Donuts in York all made Yelp’s list of top 100 U.S. restaurants this year. For those rankings, the restaurant review website in February said it asked users about restaurants they couldn’t get enough of and evaluated the most popular spots.

This time around, other restaurants in the Carolinas that were named among The New York Times’ favorites were Chai Pani in Asheville and Kindred in Davidson, The Charlotte Observer reported.

SC Unveils Portrait of Reconstruction-Era Black Senator

CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — South Carolina has put up a portrait of a Reconstruction-era Black lawmaker in the state Senate chamber — part of an effort to recognize a broader array of historical figures in a place that once flew the Confederate battle flag at the Statehouse.Some lawmakers who worked for the recognition of the late Sen. Stephen Atkins Swails said they are unhappy the painting went up without a ceremony, The Stat...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — South Carolina has put up a portrait of a Reconstruction-era Black lawmaker in the state Senate chamber — part of an effort to recognize a broader array of historical figures in a place that once flew the Confederate battle flag at the Statehouse.

Some lawmakers who worked for the recognition of the late Sen. Stephen Atkins Swails said they are unhappy the painting went up without a ceremony, The State reported.

“I think it deserves more recognition than a last-minute, knee-jerk email from the president of the Senate under the cloak of darkness,” said Democratic Sen. Sen. Marlon Kimpson of Charleston.

The newspaper reported that after an email about the portrait was sent to senators and staff Thursday, one white state senator hit “reply all” with a comment about Swails' complexion.

“That sure is the whitest looking black guy I’ve ever seen,” Republican Sen. Sandy Senn of Charleston wrote, adding an emoji of a person shrugging. “Anyway, thanks for sharing!”

Reached Friday, Senn told The State she could not believe her response had become “this big news story.”

“I really cannot understand why one of my Senate colleagues would think my observation, which was spot-on, was anything inappropriate or sinister because it wasn’t,” Senn said.

Kimpson said he didn't want to discuss Senn’s comments.

“I think it distracts from the historic significance of this portrait," Kimpson said. “There ought to be a front-page story about Sgt. Swails, not these sideshow comments.”

Swails was born in Pennsylvania to a Black father and a white mother in 1832, and went to South Carolina in the military. He stormed Fort Wagner on Morris Island as part of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment, one of the nation’s first Black fighting units whose story was immortalized in the film “Glory.” In 1865, he became the first commissioned Black officer in the Union Army. After military service, Swails stayed in South Carolina to work for the Freedman’s Bureau.

He was also a businessman, newspaper editor and lawyer. He served in the South Carolina Senate from 1868 to 1878, becoming its first Black president pro tempore.

In a 2008 resolution, state lawmakers said Swails provided leadership “during the turbulent years of the Reconstruction period, in which the struggle for civil rights began in earnest.” Their resolution sought to honor Swails with a portrait in the Senate chamber, which has rows of pictures, most depicting white men.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

2 SC cities voted among Top 5 best US small cities in popular magazine ranking

Two South Carolina cities were tallied among Conde Nast’s best small cities for 2021, which was announced Tuesday.Charleston slipped to No. 2 on the list of best small cities in the United States after holding the No. 1 spot last year. It’s been on the list for 10 years.Greenville, meanwhile. moved up to fifth from sixth. Greenville has been on the list for five years.Topping the list was Aspen, Colorado.Conde N...

Two South Carolina cities were tallied among Conde Nast’s best small cities for 2021, which was announced Tuesday.

Charleston slipped to No. 2 on the list of best small cities in the United States after holding the No. 1 spot last year. It’s been on the list for 10 years.

Greenville, meanwhile. moved up to fifth from sixth. Greenville has been on the list for five years.

Topping the list was Aspen, Colorado.

Conde Nast Traveler wrote that the winners were culled from 800,000 votes by readers. It is the 34th annual report.

The magazine used the same words from 2020 to describe Charleston.

“Charleston may be a small town, but this city punches well above its weight,” the magazine said, noting history, culture, food and charm as Charleston’s top qualities.

It also encouraged people to try to resist moving there after having oysters and a drink on an outdoor terrace.

Charleston is South Carolina’s largest city, and its population increased by 25% in the last decade to 150,227.

Greenville, the state’s seventh-largest city with half the population of Charleston, was once again described by Conde Nast as a secret destination on the “cusp of stardom. “ The magazine lauded the city’s farm-to-table food scene and encouraged a stop at Vault & Vator, the city’s first speakeasy.

“Its craft beer scene is seeing a similar explosion,” the magazine said.

Once, again the magazine highlighted Falls Park in downtown Greenville and the Prisma Health Swamp Rabbit Trail, which starts in downtown Greenville and runs 22 miles north to Travelers Rest.

“Greenville is no longer a ‘well-kept secret’ or ‘hidden gem,’” Mayor Knox White said in an statement. “Visitors from around the world have fallen in love with our walkable Main Street, bikeable trails and shoppable boutiques.”

Others on the list of best small cities were No. 3 Alexandria, Virginia; No. 4 Santa Fe, New Mexico; No. 5 Carmel-by-the-Sea, California; No. 7 Key West, Florida; No. 8 Savannah, Georgia; No. 9 Jackson Hole, Wyoming; and No. 10 Newport, Rhode Island.

Laguna Beach, California, dropped off the list, and Newport was added.

The best large cities list was also announced with, once again, Chicago coming in at No. 1. Nashville was the only southeastern city to make the list. It was 10th.

Other cities were No. 2 New York City; No. 3 New Orleans; No. 4 Boston; No. 5 Santa Fe; No. 6 Washington, D.C.; No. 7 San Diego; No. 8 Portland, Oregon; and No. 9 Honolulu.

San Antonio, Tucson and St. Petersburg dropped out of the top 10. Santa Fe, Portland and Honolulu were new for 2021.

The battle against the Asian Longhorned Beetle, nearly one year later

CHARLESTON COUNTY, S.C. (WCBD) – Nearly a year has passed since forestry officials first started working to eradicate the Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB), an invasive pest that is killing trees in a nearly 75 square mile quarantine zone down Savannah Highway.This infestation in portions of Charleston county is the only known population of this beetle in the state, and one of only 4 areas regulated for the invasive insect in the country.“At this point we have just over 5,000 trees that we know about, roughly half of th...

CHARLESTON COUNTY, S.C. (WCBD) – Nearly a year has passed since forestry officials first started working to eradicate the Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB), an invasive pest that is killing trees in a nearly 75 square mile quarantine zone down Savannah Highway.

This infestation in portions of Charleston county is the only known population of this beetle in the state, and one of only 4 areas regulated for the invasive insect in the country.

“At this point we have just over 5,000 trees that we know about, roughly half of those have been removed,” says Dr. David Coyle, a professor of Forest Health and Invasive Species at Clemson who has been leading the charge to remove this pest from the Palmetto state.

“So we’re making pretty good progress, but the problem is that a lot of the trees that remain standing that are infested are in areas that are much more difficult to get to.”

Each infected tree, marked for death with an orange dot, must be cut down and destroyed but many fall on their own as “This thing basically makes swiss cheese out of the inside of the tree. The branches fall off, the stems fall off, essentially the tree just falls apart because this thing is just eating wood all the way through there.”

After feeding for months as a larvae, the Asian Longhorned Beetle then emerges as a grown adult- boring a perfectly round hole to go on to the next host. Thankfully this big black beetle isn’t too mobile, unlike another invasive species that’s making headlines recently: the spotted lantern fly. Thankfully this devastating pest hasn’t yet made it to South Carolina but is spreading like wildfire throughout the Northeast. Coyle believes that it will eventually make its way south, saying, “I think lantern flies are always going to be in North America at this point. I don’t see us ever getting rid of it. I have a different on Asian Longhorned Beetle. I do think we can eradicate it from North America- it’s just going to take a long time.”

This likely years-long mission begins by eliminating them here- possibly with other insects joining in on our side of the fight, “There’s a little wasp that’s present throughout Eastern North America, it’s not anything non-native it’s something we already have here. They have shown that it will readily attack ALB in a lab setting. Next year we’re gonna try to see if we can use them to combat some of these Asian Longhorned Beetles.”

While David Coyle and his colleagues at Clemson and the U.S. Department of Agriculture continue to clear this infestation, they urge all Lowcountry residents to keep an eye out just in case any beetles make it out of the quarantine zone- which thankfully looks to be holding strong with no other sightings reported outside the area as of October 2021.

For more information on the signs of an Asian Longhorned Beetle infestation- watch our previous “Moment of Science” segment here. If you believe you may have ALB in your yard or neighborhood, email invasives@clemson.edu or you can call the Clemson Department of Plant Industry at (843) 973-8329.

Storm Team 2 Meteorologist David Dickson

SC Ports Authority says it can’t support current plan for Charleston flood wall

A representative of the State Ports Authority said a proposed hurricane surge wall for downtown Charleston conflicts with the agency’s plans for two properties on the Cooper River.One of them — Union Pier, is where cruise ships used to dock before the coronavirus pandemic and where SPA is working on a redevelopment plan that will eventually put the land in private hands.The other, Columbus Street Terminal, is used to export Volvos and BMWs that are built in South Carolina and holds $600 million in autos at any given...

A representative of the State Ports Authority said a proposed hurricane surge wall for downtown Charleston conflicts with the agency’s plans for two properties on the Cooper River.

One of them — Union Pier, is where cruise ships used to dock before the coronavirus pandemic and where SPA is working on a redevelopment plan that will eventually put the land in private hands.

The other, Columbus Street Terminal, is used to export Volvos and BMWs that are built in South Carolina and holds $600 million in autos at any given time.

Jordi Yarborough, senior vice president of external affairs at SPA, made the comments Sept. 22 at the public meeting of a committee convened to give input on the $1.1 billion wall plan from the Army Corps of Engineers. Yarborough was protesting a proposed path for the wall that would leave the terminal and pier on the outside.

“As it stands now, we can’t be supportive of this,” Yarborough said.

The comments are some of the most significant opposition to the plan so far as the Corps has slowly refined it for the past year and a half. They also underscore the challenges of placing a wall around a city where many businesses rely on access to the water, even as sea level rise and hurricanes pose a persistent threat.

The Corps’ plan, designed to protect Charleston from the surge of ocean water that comes with a cyclone, includes a wall that rises about 8 feet past the point where the city floods from tides. It would wrap around the city for 8 miles, include dozens of gates that would stay open during dry times and 10 pumps to evacuate rainfall when those gates are closed to rising tides.

Yarborough also said during the meeting she hasn’t been able to get a clear answer on whether the agency could convince the Corps to move the wall later if the city proceeds with the plan and engineers start a more detailed design.

Dale Morris, Charleston’s chief resiliency officer, responded that the wall’s path can be moved in that next design phase, preconstruction engineering and design, also referred to as PED.

Corps spokeswoman Jaclyn Pennoyer confirmed this in an email, and said the wall could be moved because of new building technology, the results of further engineering analysis, buried cultural resources, buried utilities or situations where the Corps can’t secure the land it needs to build.

But there are significant challenges for where to put a wall at the ports’ sites, Morris added.

Right now, the wall would run landward of SPA’s facilities, along Morrison Drive and East Bay Street west of the Columbus Street Terminal, and along Washington Street west of Union Pier.

Moving it into the water, on the opposite side of the terminal and pier, would likely spur strong objections from state and federal agencies that regulate the environment, Morris said. (Indeed, those groups objected last year when parts of the wall were placed in water or marsh.) Building in water can also be three times more expensive than building on land, Morris and Pennoyer said.

In an interview after the meeting, Morris said it’s a goal of the city to protect the ports’ sites, especially Union Pier, where there could one day be a mixed-use development of housing and commercial space. A better option might be a wall that crosses the sites at the high water lines, he said, leaving some of the facilities protected but avoiding the issues with building in the Cooper River.

“The port’s concerns about being outside of the structure are legit, and we’re with them,” Morris told the Post and Courier.

Yarborough did not respond to a follow-up phone message after the meeting.

In an email, SPA spokeswoman Liz Crumley wrote, “SC Ports will continue working with the City of Charleston and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to provide input on the sea wall proposal to ensure no adverse impacts to marine terminal operations on the peninsula.”

The committee where Yarborough made her comments was convened in the spring and includes residents, businesspeople, and members of the environmental and preservation communities in Charleston. It is due to give Charleston City Council a recommendation on whether to pursue the wall plan this autumn, though the date for that presentation has been pushed a few times.

City Council is also expected to vote on whether to pursue the wall plan into the more-detailed PED step by the end of the year. If it does so, it will have to certify that Charleston can pay for its part of the project, about $384.5 million.

On Sept. 22, several members of the advisory group said there was still more investigation needed before making a recommendation on the plan, and that it had been hard to get answers on details of the wall and how the city of Charleston will fund its portion of the work.

“The answers that we’re getting are ‘Don’t worry, it will be handled in PED,’ ” said Dan Battista of real estate developer Lowe. The company is helping SPA prepare plans for Union Pier.

“Under the current due diligence, a lot more needs to be done,” Battista added. “I don’t want to be rushed to have to make a decision.”

But Morris said that without moving forward into the next step in the engineering process, Charleston would never get an answer on whether there is a wall alignment that would work in complicated settings such as around the SPA terminals.

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