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AC Repair in Johns Island, SC

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South Carolina is one of the most beautiful places in the United States to call home. However, our local weather can be extreme - high temps and thick humidity in the summer and chilly winter weather during cold months. As a local HVAC company in Johns Island, SC, we know how crucial it is to have a quality HVAC system in your home and experienced technicians to keep it working correctly.

With more than 35 years of serving the Lowcountry, we are proud to be an active part of our local community. As your neighbors, we are here for all of your HVAC needs, whether you need a new AC unit installed this summer or a heat pump replacement this winter. With a reliable team of NATE-certified technicians and decades of experience in our industry, no HVAC project is too big or small for us to handle.

We offer highly competitive pricing and convenient financing options for all of our clients. At the end of the day, our goal is to make it easy and affordable to live comfortably in your home all year long. We are committed to hard work, honesty, and integrity with every service we offer. If you aren't 100% satisfied with our work, we'll do our part to make it right.

Service Areas

Here are just a few of the reasons why homeowners and business owners in South Carolina trust Action Heating & Air Conditioning:

  • We have been serving clients in South Carolina since 1983 - before many of our clients were even born!
  • We provide a wide range of HVAC services for both heating and air conditioning.
  • We are committed to giving our clients the highest quality products and services at affordable prices.
  • As a Carrier® Factory Authorized Dealer, we have the best HVAC units available.
  • We are members of the South Carolina Association of Heating and Air Conditioning Contractors.
  • We are members of our local Chamber of Commerce and the Air Conditioning Contractors of America.

If you need a trusted AC repair company in Johns Island, know that our team is geared up and ready to help you today. While you browse our website, have a look at just a few of our specialties here at Action Heating & Air Conditioning:

Air Conditioning Repair in Johns Island, SC

Summers in the Lowcountry are hot, humid, and sticky. After a long day at the beach or downtown with your friends, nothing feels better than kicking back on the sofa while your air conditioning cools you off. On the other hand, nothing feels worse than walking into your home and feeling warm, stale air hit your face. Those who know, know - having your AC go out during a South Carolina summer is no joke. With time, a relatively minor inconvenience can turn into a real health problem.

In situations like these, something has probably gone wrong with your HVAC system. If your AC has stopped working in the middle of summer, it's time to call Action Heating & Air Conditioning right away. Our team of certified HVAC professionals has years of experience repairing and servicing AC equipment. It doesn't matter how old your unit is or what brand you bought - we have the skills to get your home comfort system up and running in no time.

Heating And Air Conditioning Johns Island, SC
Here are just a few of the AC issues that our talented team can help solve for you:
 Heating And Air Conditioning Services Johns Island, SC

Air Conditioning Drainage Block

Over time, condensation builds up in your AC equipment because of its cooling process. This accumulated byproduct must be drained regularly, or the increased amounts of moisture can damage your air conditioner's components.

 AC Repair Services Johns Island, SC

Air Conditioning Refrigerant Leak

Refrigerant is the substance responsible for keeping your home nice and cool in the summer. When refrigerant levels drop due to a leak, it will affect your AC equipment's ability to cool your home. If your HVAC unit isn't blowing cold air, this could be a reason why.

 HVAC Repair Services Johns Island, SC

Heater Keeps Running

This is a common AC issue in South Carolina and the U.S. in general. Sometimes this problem is fixed by switching your thermostat to "auto." If that doesn't work, you may have a broken thermostat or a wiring issue that needs to be addressed quickly.

 Air Conditioning Johns Island, SC

Burning Odors

It's normal for your heater to produce a slight burning smell if it hasn't been used in a while. However, if you are experiencing a persistent burning smell during the summer months when your air conditioning is on, it could be a serious problem. Turn off your HVAC system immediately and call our office as soon as possible so that we may send out a technician to diagnose your problem.

 AC Repair Johns Island, SC

Broken Air Conditioning Compressor Fan

This fan plays an important role in your AC unit's heat transfer process. When your air conditioning fan breaks, your AC equipment won't be able to cool your home off in the summer when it's needed the most.

Our Special Offers

One of our goals as a company is to provide HVAC repair services at fair and competitive prices. In addition, we want you to feel confident about investing in high-quality heating and cooling systems without having to worry a lot about the costs. We make sure to provide honest and accurate quotes and we offer a variety of financing options. We want you to get the best bang for your buck, so here are some special offers.

See Our Offer

If you are experiencing any of the problems above, be sure to hire a professional contractor to fix your issues. For your safety, don't ever try to make HVAC repairs on your own unless you are trained. When the time come to have your air conditioning system repaired, our team of licensed AC technicians will handle all of the hard work on your behalf. That way, you can stay safe and have peace of mind knowing you're in good hands.

Air Conditioning Install in Johns Island, SC

Your HVAC system works hard all year long. If you have gone years without much maintenance or AC repair, you probably bought a great HVAC unit. However, with constant use and even normal wear and tear, even the highest-quality HVAC systems are prone to malfunctions. Eventually, it will need to be replaced.

If you need an energy-efficient, reliable cooling system for your home or business, you have come to the right place. We have decades of experience installing new AC systems for our clients and can handle any installation project you have. As a Carrier® Factory Authorized Dealer, we have the most top-rated AC systems available in South Carolina.

At Action Heating & Air Conditioning, we know that buying a new air conditioner and installing it can be a huge source of stress. But when you work with us, it doesn't have to be that way. We have made it our mission to make the AC installation process easy and efficient for our customers. That way, they can focus more on living life and enjoying their home while we work hard on their AC install in Johns Island.

Whether you plan to replace a faulty air conditioning system or need a Carrier unit for your new construction home, we have got you covered. We will work with you directly to find the best fit for your home and budget. We are also happy to answer all of your AC installation questions prior to and during your initial service appointment.

 Heater Repair Services Johns Island, SC

Common Signs That You Need a New AC Install in Johns Island, SC

Trying to figure out whether your air conditioner needs to be repaired or replaced can be a tricky decision to make. Most people have a hard time letting things go, and that includes AC units. It can be hard to know when to let go of the old and welcome in the new. To help save you time and make your decision a little easier, keep the following signs in mind. If you find yourself saying, "that sounds like my AC unit," it might be time for a new air conditioning installation.

 HVAC Repair Johns Island, SC

Strange Noises

Almost all air conditioners make a bit of low-level noise as they warm up and turn off. However, if you hear loud, unusual noises, it might be a sign that your air conditioner's time is coming to an end. Buzzing and rattling noises are often indicators of a loose part. Grinding and whistling noises may mean something more serious is happening. Because these issues won't dissipate over time, it's crucial to have your air conditioner examined if you hear loud, strange noises.

Frequent Repairs

Johns Island AC repair is essential for keeping your air conditioner working efficiently. Sometimes, however, it makes more sense from a cost perspective to install a replacement system. This is especially true if your repairs are racking up. Some AC experts suggest using the "$5,000 rule" if you're considering a new AC install. Simply multiply the age of your air conditioner by the costs you have been paying to repair your unit. If that amount is over $5,000, it may make more financial sense to install a new air conditioner rather than pay for expensive repairs throughout the year.

Higher Energy Bills

If you notice that your energy bill has significantly increased in price, it could be a sign that your HVAC unit is struggling to cool your home effectively. Try to be mindful of your air conditioner's cooling cycles. If you notice frequent cycles, even in the summer, it could be the reason for your increased energy bill. In these cases, it's best to have an expert test your system to see if a repair or replacement option is best for your family.

Age of Air Conditioning Unit

This sign is a no-brainer and one of the easiest ways to tell if you need to install a new AC system. On average, your HVAC unit will have a lifespan of 12 to 15 years. If your unit is more than ten years old and doesn't have the "pizzaz" that it once had, it might be time to think about installing a new air conditioning unit.

R-22 Refrigerant

Old air conditioners usually require a type of refrigerant called R-22. This substance is very harmful to the environment and has been all but outlawed on newer HVAC systems. If your AC unit is old enough to require R-22, you should give serious thought to replacing your system with a newer, environmentally friendly solution.

Call Action Heating & Air Conditioning Today!

Over our 35+ year history, we have built our reputation on honesty, skilled workmanship, and reasonable pricing. If you are on the hunt for the highest quality air conditioning repair in Johns Island, SC, give our office a call today.

Call us at 843-890-0532

Protecting Your Investment

Your air conditioning system works very hard every day, all year long to keep your home comfy and cool. Machines that work hard year-round are going to require maintenance and ongoing services to stay operational.

As a family-owned and operated HVAC company in Johns Island, SC, we know better than anyone how expensive it can be to maintain an AC unit. We know that money doesn't grow on trees. We also understand that finding last-minute resources to fix an air conditioning system can be challenging. That is why we offer extended warranties for your new or existing AC equipment. With an extended warranty from Action Heating & Air Conditioning, you benefit from repairs, replacement, and additional services covered under warranty. That way, you can enjoy your HVAC products as long as possible.

 Heating And AC Services Johns Island, SC
If you're having second thoughts about purchasing an extended warranty, consider these points:
  • Generally speaking, HVAC equipment lasts anywhere from 10 to 15 years. However, warranties provided by the factory will often expire before the service life of your cooling unit is over. With an extended warranty, your indoor comfort system is covered even if the factory warranty expires.
  • Having an extended warranty on your AC system gives you the chance to project and plan for any HVAC costs. This helps you balance your budget and anticipate expenses so you aren't caught off guard. Having a warranty will also help protect your budget against increases in labor and parts costs due to inflation.
  • If you're thinking of selling your home, having an extended warranty may help raise your home's value. You may also be able to transfer your extended warranty to your new home if you choose to do so.

Latest News in Johns Island, SC

Johns Island conservation easement would protect flood-prone area from development

A 94-acre property on Johns Island that was once the site of a proposed 240-home community may be protected from all future development.Charleston City Council on April 12 approved allocating about $515,000 of its greenbelt funding toward a conservation easement for the property, known as the Oakville Tract.Greenbelt funding is set aside by Charleston County to various municipalities in the county for conservation projects. The Lowcountry Land Trust is drafting the agreement to protect the property and matching the city’s...

A 94-acre property on Johns Island that was once the site of a proposed 240-home community may be protected from all future development.

Charleston City Council on April 12 approved allocating about $515,000 of its greenbelt funding toward a conservation easement for the property, known as the Oakville Tract.

Greenbelt funding is set aside by Charleston County to various municipalities in the county for conservation projects. The Lowcountry Land Trust is drafting the agreement to protect the property and matching the city’s allocation using funds from a grant awarded through the state of South Carolina.

“You wouldn’t want to be developing this site, it’s very low, it’s subject to flooding and it can have an impact on the overall drainage basin,” Mayor John Tecklenburg said during a Charleston City Council Real Estate Committee meeting April 11.

The Charleston Aviation Authority bought two parcels of land in August, including the Oakville tract, to prevent homes from sprouting on the edge of the 1,333-acre Charleston Executive Airport next to the Stono River.

The purchases will allow the airport to widen and extend one of its runways and use the Oakville tract as an undeveloped “clear zone” or safety buffer for the runway. The most that the Aviation Authority could build on the Oakville tract under the proposed conservation easement would be a road connecting different areas of the airport to each other, said City Councilman Karl Brady who represents the area.

“I think its a huge win because the airport gets a buffer zone and we’re able to save that low-lying land,” Brady said.

The 94-acre Oakville tract is mostly located in the city of Charleston but is partially within the county. It is also located entirely within the urban growth boundary, an area where higher density of development is allowed on Johns Island. The low-lying piece of land is also on Burden Creek. Preserving it from development will allow runoff to continue downstream rather than be blocked by homes, roads and businesses.

“There would have been a lot of repercussion upstream,” said Johns Island Taskforce Chairman John Zlogar of the previous proposal to build homes on the property. The task force was established in 2013 to bring together residents and local officials to address Johns Island-specific issues.

The Charleston Aviation Authority bought the Oakville tract and another 43-acre tract for $7.7 million. Out of that, $4.9 million went to the developers of the proposed community on the Oakville tract for the estimated development rights of the land. If the use of the city of Charleston’s allocation of greenbelt funds is given final approval by Charleston County, the Aviation Authority has agreed to donate $3.9 million worth of those development rights, said Natalie Olson, Sea Islands Program Director for the Lowcountry Land Trust.

The grant funds would reimburse the Aviation Authority for about $1 million worth of those land rights. The agency will retain ownership of the property, but the conservation easement will limit all development on it in perpetuity.

City Councilman Ross Appel told members of the Real Estate Committee that it is common for airports to create “buffer zones” along the edges of their properties.

“These airports are economic engines and there is going to be a lot of desire to develop in and around this area,” Appel said.

Charleston County Council’s Finance Committee will vote April 21 whether to approve the city’s allocation of its share of greenbelt funds to the conservation easement. The proposal will then need a final vote from County Council.

The Oakville property is one of several tracts of land on Johns Island that are being considered for greenbelt funds. County Council’s Finance Committee will also consider approving greenbelt funds to place conservation easements on two large properties, a 700-acre tract along the Stono River known as Ravenswood and a 35-acre tract that once included the Sea Islands Farmers Cooperative. The co-op was founded by Black farmers in the 1970s.

South Carolina Supreme Court returns 14 congregations to Episcopal diocese

[Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina] The South Carolina Supreme Court ruled April 20 that 14 South Carolina churches that were once part of The Episcopal Church and the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina shall be returned, along with all real and personal property held in trust for the diocese, including the St. Christopher Camp and Conference Center on Seabrook Island.The churches left the diocese in 2012 and later joined the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA) and the April 20 news marks another milestone in a nearly decade-lo...

[Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina] The South Carolina Supreme Court ruled April 20 that 14 South Carolina churches that were once part of The Episcopal Church and the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina shall be returned, along with all real and personal property held in trust for the diocese, including the St. Christopher Camp and Conference Center on Seabrook Island.

The churches left the diocese in 2012 and later joined the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA) and the April 20 news marks another milestone in a nearly decade-long legal journey that included a lower court decision in 2014 which was largely overturned by the state’s high court in 2017 and then further clarified with the decision this week.

Of the decision, the Rt. Rev. Ruth Woodliff-Stanley, bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina, said: “Their decisions will no doubt bring joy to many in our diocese, but for others, there will be grief in the possible finality of a loss they have been feeling for nearly 10 years.” She also added a hope for the future of the reconciled diocese: “We now walk into a bright future, one in which we will focus on the reconciling power of the Gospel to transform injustice, to heal the brokenhearted, and to build God’s beloved community.”

The South Carolina Supreme Court, using a variety of determining factors, decided that 14 parishes (of the 29 previously named) did create an “irrevocable trust in favor of the National Church and its diocese” (the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina – the “Associated Diocese”). These 14 parishes are as follows: Christ Church, Mt. Pleasant; Good Shepherd, Charleston; Holy Comforter, Sumter; Holy Cross, Stateburg; Holy Trinity, Charleston; St. Bartholomew’s, Hartsville; St. David’s, Cheraw; St. Luke’s, Hilton Head; St. Matthew’s, Fort Motte; St. James, Charleston; St. John’s, Johns Island; St. Jude’s, Walterboro; Trinity, Myrtle Beach; and Old St. Andrew’s, Charleston.

Conversely, the Court found that 15 of the 29 parishes “did not create a trust in favor of the National Church or its diocese, and thus those 15 Parishes retain title to their real estate.” These parishes are as follows: All Saints, Florence; Church of our Saviour, John’s Island; Church of the Cross, Bluffton; Christ-St. Paul’s, Yonges Island; Epiphany, Eutawville; Redeemer, Orangeburg; Resurrection, Surfside/Myrtle Beach; St. Helena’s, Beaufort; St. Paul’s, Bennettsville; St. Paul’s, Summerville; St. Philip’s, Charleston; St. Luke & St. Paul, Charleston; St. Michael’s, Charleston; Trinity, Edisto; and Trinity, Pinopolis.

The South Carolina Supreme Court has decided that all real and personal property, including the St. Christopher Camp and Conference Center, have been held “in trust for the benefit of the National Church [The Episcopal Church] and the Associated Diocese,” meaning the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina. The ruling further concluded that “the real and personal property held in trust by the Trustees is now held for the benefit of the Associated Diocese.”

On all matters and questions relating to “names, styles, emblems, and service marks,” the Court deferred to the federal court. The U.S. District Court previously ruled in favor of The Episcopal Church and the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina (also recognized as The Episcopal Church in South Carolina) in September 2019. This decision has been appealed, but any future rulings were stayed pending the outcome of this state case.

In her pastoral letter to the diocese sent hours after receiving the opinion, Woodlff-Stanley discussed the next steps for the diocese. “We are still working to understand the immediate path forward and promise to be in communication with you as our legal team helps us determine what comes next,” said Woodliff-Stanley. “May we focus together on reconciliation and the way of love as we journey together on the road ahead, centered in Christ’s love for all of us.”

The Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina was one of the nine original dioceses that formed The Episcopal Church in 1785. The Episcopal Church, which encompasses 111 dioceses and regional areas in 17 nations of the world, remains the only denomination in the United States affiliated with the worldwide Anglican Communion.

Work on freestanding James Island ER to begin this week

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — A new medical facility is coming to James Island. Prep work on Trident Health’s new freestanding ER is expected to kick off this week.Trident Health officials say in just a year’s time from now, the James Island facility will give more immediate access to emergency care residents in the area.While rain delayed the official groundbreaking Monday, it will not slow down the work that will begin onsite. Trident Health officials say site prep is expected to begin in the coming days and m...

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — A new medical facility is coming to James Island. Prep work on Trident Health’s new freestanding ER is expected to kick off this week.

Trident Health officials say in just a year’s time from now, the James Island facility will give more immediate access to emergency care residents in the area.

While rain delayed the official groundbreaking Monday, it will not slow down the work that will begin onsite. Trident Health officials say site prep is expected to begin in the coming days and materials will soon be brought to the new location at 945 Folly Road, located right across from the Palmetto Goodwill.

The $12.5 million facility will have 11 in-patient beds to start out, with the ability to grow to fit even more beds. It will be equipped with advanced imaging and diagnostic labs, as well as stroke and behavioral health telemedicine services.

Trident’s President and CEO Christina Oh says it was her connection to similar underserved communities which pushed her to expand Trident’s resources to the James Island area.

“It's really exciting to see that now we have an opportunity to bring emergency services and all the associated care that comes with that to a community that's needed it for a very long time. I’m from southern West Virginia, so I have a special passion, especially with my family coming from a public health background, I have a special passion for bringing health care, especially emergency care to communities that traditionally have not been exposed to it,” Oh said.

This will be Trident’s fourth freestanding Emergency Room facility, adding to locations in Monck’s Corner, Brighton Park and North Charleston, whose facilities served over 150,000 patients in 2021 alone.

A free-standing ER facility allows for the same emergency medical care given at larger medical center, like Trident Medical Center’s headquarters in North Charleston. However, the services would be within a smaller facility right in a community’s backyard.

Doctors say that not having to drive the extra 30 to 40 minutes to a medical center or ER facility can be the difference between life and death.

Facilities like the James Island ER can help stabilize patients in need of immediate care in situations such as strokes, heart attacks and other high trauma injuries until they can get to a larger medical center for further treatment.

The ER can also alleviate pressure on emergency departments at larger facilities when they are at capacity.

Trident Medical Center’s facilities helped over 350,000 people annually over the course of the pandemic and doctors say it was the challenges faced during those times which made expanding their resources a primary concern.

“I think COVID brought to light how important it was to have everybody to make sure that everybody has access to health care and to high quality health care,” Emergency Medical Physician with Trident Health, Ibrahim Isa said. “So when you improve your outreach and improve how easy it is for people to seek emergency medical care, you can actually improve outcomes and how healthy people are in some of these communities.”

The freestanding ER on James Island will be open for use 24/7 and is expected to be up and running by April of 2023.

The original groundbreaking ceremony was set for today at 10 a.m. Monday, but due to weather conditions, it will be pushed back two weeks to Monday, May 2 at the same time.

5 SC woodworkers who make unusual products, from joggling boards to hand-carved tables

Custom woodworking doesn’t always mean tables.And South Carolina craftsmen have come up with some doozies. Sure, they can make tables, bed frames and chairs, but not everyone can make canoe paddles so pretty you’d want to hang it on your wall. Or baseball bats and rolling pins. How about a boggle board?Here are five South Carolina woodworkers who offer more than a beautiful table or tables with a twist.James Herndon has always been fascinated with boats. He made his first of plywood when he was 12 years old....

Custom woodworking doesn’t always mean tables.

And South Carolina craftsmen have come up with some doozies. Sure, they can make tables, bed frames and chairs, but not everyone can make canoe paddles so pretty you’d want to hang it on your wall. Or baseball bats and rolling pins. How about a boggle board?

Here are five South Carolina woodworkers who offer more than a beautiful table or tables with a twist.

James Herndon has always been fascinated with boats. He made his first of plywood when he was 12 years old.

“They didn’t look very nice,” he said.

What does look nice are the paddles for canoes and stand-up paddle boards he makes when he’s not working his steady job as an automobile collision repairman.

He has made them for about 15 years of exotic hardwoods like bloodwood, red wood, maple and mahogany.

They range in price from $420 to $1,100.

If people recoil at the price — you can buy a standard paddle for $15 at Cabela’s — he just casually suggests they try to make one themselves.

“They get real quiet,” he said.

His stepson never finished the one he started.

And no one ever thought to take a Cabela’s paddle and hang it on the wall as they do with Herndon’s creations.

Capers Landrum Cauthen does make tables, but what’s so special about them is just about every one is made from reclaimed wood. Wood from century-old Charleston homes and businesses. Trees downed by hurricanes.

Not too long ago, he took the wood from the Charleston Visitors Center when the building was remodeled. Huge timbers that he used to make benches and tables for, you guessed it, furnishings for the center.

Cauthen’s father was the longtime director of the Historic Preservation Society of Charleston and the first professional curator of historic properties in Columbia, including the Hampton-Preston House and the Robert Mills House and was the designer of the Boyleston Gardens, separating the Lace House and the Boyleston House, now a part of the Governor’s Mansion complex.

His grandfather was an editor at The State and the Columbia Record, credited with coining the term Midlands, Cauthen said.

Capers Cauthen did home renovations initially. Then in 1989, Hurricane Hugo blew through the Lowcountry.

“It opened my eyes,” he said.

Now, Cauthen has pallets and pallets of reclaimed wood in his storage facility. And he claims to be able to find any specific species he needs for a project.

Tim Martin, a high school baseball player, decided to make his own bat. Then he made one for every member of the team. Now at 24, he’s making rolling pins for television renovator Joanna Gaines’s Magnolia Shop and tables, desks and beds for a Charleston interior designer.

He makes cutting boards. He made a 10-foot-long table from teak. Doors, signs. A huge frame from a split tree — hence the business name — for a man who wanted to frame a very large flag, all by hand.

Operating from his garage, Martin relies on help from his parents and siblings to run the business.

His mother, Tina, says her son’s success is as much about attitude as it is about talent. He doesn’t say no. If someone asks for something he’s not made before he simply says he’ll try.

Perry Gervais spent a career as an executive of a company that made asphalt shingles. It was OK, but when the company sold, Gervais decided he wanted to do something where he could see a project through to the end.

Woodworking fit the bill. His home place is along the Stono River in John’s Island — hence the name. His mother had wanted a joggling board for her porch for sometime. It was a hit. Other people wanted one.

Then he moved on to other products. Each one handcrafted. He makes sea chests, toolboxes, tables, benches and stools. And one of the more creative items is a rocking boat — like a rocking horse but a boat.

And he makes real boats — skiffs, for shrimping, fishing and, as he says it, playing in the creeks and rivers as he did as a boy and continues to do as a man.

“When I’m working I lose track of time,” he said. “It’s just a labor of love.”

Josh Cox learned woodworking as a child in his grandfather’s warehouse on Bricker Hill in Salem, Ohio. Now, he makes handcrafted tables and consoles that he ships around the world, to Australia and all across the United States.

His great-grandfather was a master woodworker as well.

Cox started Bricker & Beam about eight years ago and gets the word out about his work through social media, etsy and direct search on his website. He also works with interior designers.

For a time he had a spin-off business, Bricker & Bark, to make custom dog beds that often went to customers in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco, making the shipping cost about half the price of the piece.

He said he’ll still make a dog bed if someone wants one, but that business is largely dormant.

Cox said he most enjoys making Mobley cabinets because he hand carves the fronts, using a special tool similar to something a metalworker would use.

“Woodworking is therapeutic,” he said. And at the end of a day, you have something to show for it.

On a personal note, Cox said he is getting ready to build a house on some land in Blythewood. He will make the cabinets from some white oak and cherry his grandfather has had for 20 years, when he hired Amish workers to thin trees on his property.

Cox was about 7 years old then. It was the moment he made the connection between trees, lumber and home products, setting the stage for Bricker & Beam.

Physical Education Grad Overcomes Hardships to Earn Degree

As the Class of 2022 prepares for Commencement, May 6–7, The College Today will highlight how some of our graduating seniors spent their time at CofC, and what the future holds.Pierre “PJ” Edwards II doesn’t recall ever having an African American male teacher. A native of Charleston, South Carolina, Edwards grew up on James Island where he attended public K-12 schools.“I was one of those kids on the outskirts,” says Edwards. “There weren’t very m...

As the Class of 2022 prepares for Commencement, May 6–7, The College Today will highlight how some of our graduating seniors spent their time at CofC, and what the future holds.

Pierre “PJ” Edwards II doesn’t recall ever having an African American male teacher. A native of Charleston, South Carolina, Edwards grew up on James Island where he attended public K-12 schools.

“I was one of those kids on the outskirts,” says Edwards. “There weren’t very many people who looked like me at school.”

That’s part of what makes the Call Me MISTER (Mentors Instructing Students Toward Effective Role models) program essential for future educators like Edwards, who will graduate from the College of Charleston on Saturday, May 7, 2022, with a degree in physical education. The goal of the Call Me MISTER program is to increase the pool of male teachers from diverse backgrounds, particularly African American male teachers.

“The MISTERS program literally means everything to me,” says Edwards, whose first taste of teaching came in high school when he worked for the Charleston County School District’s after school program and saw firsthand the need for more African American male teachers. “It’s a brotherhood of like-minded individuals who share the same passion and, although some of us come from different walks of life, our passions and goals are the same.”

And a passion for teaching runs in his family: Edward’s older sister Sharmaine Roaden ’11 is a Spanish teacher and inspired him to follow her path from CofC to the classroom.

Edwards will be the first to tell you that his journey through college was a long time coming. He wasn’t a traditional college student when he came to the College in 2013. With a goal of staying debt free, he commuted 30 minutes to campus to attend classes full time, while also juggling four jobs.

“In 2017 I became mentally and physically exhausted to the point that I could no longer keep up,” says Edwards, who had to take a three-year break before resuming classes in 2020. “I use my story to inspire others to persevere, lean into those who truly support them and remember that it’s not how you start, it’s how you finish. I advocate for male educators to be unapologetically authentic with themselves and to the young lives they’ll impact – to change the narrative and societal perspective about us and lastly to not let passion be mistaken for arrogance.”

Edwards says he would not have made it to the finish line at the College if it hadn’t been for the professors who offered him “100% support.” A few of these important educators include the late Floyd Breeland, former director of the College’s Call Me MISTER program and South Carolina state representative; Rénard Harris, vice president of access and inclusion and chief diversity officer at CofC; Karen Smail, associate professor of health and human performance; and Anthony James ’12 (M.A.T.), CofC’s director of minority education and outreach and the Call Me MISTER program. Edwards is also grateful to have received the Constantina P. Padgett Education Scholarship and a scholarship through a grant from Dominion Energy, both of which have helped enable him to fulfill his goal of graduating debt free.

“Pierre’s story is one of determination and perseverance,” says James. “After some personal hardships that impacted his academics, he left the College. He returned after a three-year hiatus, and the moment he stepped on campus, he assumed the role of mentor and leader for many of the younger MISTERs. He shared the stories of his hardship and what he had to do to overcome them. Despite struggling during his first stint at the College, Pierre returned and excelled academically. He had a 3.7 GPA his first year back. He often shares that his passion for educating children is his strongest motivator. I’m so proud of Pierre, and I know he will be a fantastic physical education teacher.”

After graduation Edwards hopes to use the skills he’s learned to advocate for the physical and emotional well-being of young males from diverse backgrounds. As a basketball coach at St. Johns High School, a rural island school located about 30 minutes from the CofC campus, he has found that “whether it’s paddle boarding or pickle ball, there’s a form of fitness for everyone. This is the best time in their lives to establish healthy habits, which – in turn – gives kids a boost in self-confidence.”

This fall he’ll put all that he has learned to use in his first official teaching job at Charleston Charter School for Math and Science. Smail says Edwards’ future students should count themselves lucky.

“Pierre is an inspiration and role model whose presence in the classroom transforms the experience for all students,” she says. “Pierre embodies the expression ‘life-long learner’ as he strives to instill in each of his students the passion for movement. Pierre is the teacher you want your child to have.”

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